SRR Files Explained in Plain English

An SRR file is used to re-create a RAR file. If you are just downloading files, you can ignore SRR files. They are similar to SFV files and only contain “meta” information. That is, they only contain information about the other files that they come along with. SRRs do not contain any audio, video, or anything else in which the average downloader might be interested.

SRR files are created by a program called ReScene. The word “scene” here has nothing to do with scenes from a video production. Rather it refers to “The Scene“, which is a community of distinguished gentleman who have adopted standards for the files that they release.

So, a “release” will contain the RAR files, PAR files, an SFV file, an NZB file, an NFO file, etc. And now increasingly, an SRR file. The average downloader would use the PARs to make sure that the RARs were OK, extract the files from the RARs, and then throw away RARs, PARs, SFV, NZB, NFO, SRR, and any other ancillary files included.

5 Responses to “SRR Files Explained in Plain English”

  1. AnaGee says:

    Thanks for the info. I’m on ‘oldie’ who is learning all this computer stuff and enjoying it, too!

  2. Ben says:

    Thanks, I confused it with SRT files, thinking it would have the same content, turned out to be quit different. Your explanation makes it all very clear.

  3. Cameron says:

    Thanks for the explanation. I love innovations in file verification and reconstruction! Great work.

  4. Gfy says:

    Obligatory links when talking about this topic:
    http://rescene.wikidot.com/
    http://www.srrdb.com/

    “So, a “release” will contain the RAR files, PAR files, an SFV file, an NZB file, an NFO file, etc. ”

    No, a “scene release posted to usenet” will. PAR files and the NZB are unique to the upload.

    “and then throw away RARs, PARs, SFV, NZB, NFO, SRR, and any other ancillary files included.”

    Ugh, who would throw away an NFO file. It often contains a link to IMDb. It might also be a bad habit for game releases.

  5. Yeti Expired says:

    Agreed pretty much but I NEVER delete the .NFO file or i’d be looking at a boatload of files wondering what the heck they are! My method is to keep the original .NFO file and make a copy of it using the title of the release for the copy. Then I also rename the directory to match the copied NFO name. For instance if I have a release that is called HelloWorld from X-FORCE, my directory / file structures will end up like this:
    C:\UNDLs\a.b.Group.Poster\HelloWorld\
    C:\UNDLs\a.b.Group.Poster\HelloWorld\Hello World v1.0-X-Force.NFO
    C:\UNDLs\a.b.Group.Poster\HelloWorld\HW.v.1.0.ISO
    C:\UNDLs\a.b.Group.Poster\HelloWorld\X-FORCE.NFO

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